Small and large spotted notation issues in Mathematics

 

In South Africa we get two species of genet: the large spotted genet and the small spotted genet. The main difference between the two lies in the colour of the tip of the tail. The large spotted genet has a black tipped tail and the small spotted one has a white tipped tail. It is not really about the size. Another difference is that the small spotted genet has entirely black spots on its body while the large spotted one has black spots with a rusty coloured centre. This is Stripes the genet who regularly comes to visit me in the evenings. I’ll leave you to decide what type of genet it is? In mathematics we need to pay close attention to the notation. A slight change can mean something completely different. For example, f(x) indicates a y-value on a Cartesian plane but f ‘(x) indicates the derivative which is the gradient at any point. Small notational difference but big mathematical difference!

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4 weeks ago

BushMaths

In the Foundation phase the focus is on counting rather than calculating. But as learners progress to the Intermediate Phase, the focus should shift to calculating more efficiently without having to count every object. For example in this photo of the Red Lechwe a learner in Grade 4 should be able to:
a) have some idea of the number of Lechwe by just looking at the photo (a feeling for numbers)
b) be able to make a rather accurate estimate by counting the Lechwe on one side and doubling that amount rather than counting all of them.
c) be able to count in groups of two or more rather than counting single objects
Contact us for more information on developing a feeling for maths early in learners.
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1 month ago

BushMaths

We recently presented our annual maths camp where we hosted our top 15 educators as a reward for their dedication to the capacity building programme for educators.

We spent the weekend at the South African Wildlife College where Dr Hannah Barnes from BushMaths presented workshops on fractions and they also got to go on multiple game drives during their stay.

It was a wonderful weekend and a great way to conclude this year's workshops. We look forward to more successful capacity building next year!

Thank you Sabrina Chielens for the photos.
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1 month ago

BushMaths

What a great weekend with this special group of people. This was our third annual BushMaths camp for Eco Children's Maths Capacity Building programme for Intermediate phase. A mix of maths and bush fun! Thank you Ecochildren for providing the 15 top attending teachers with this weekend at the South African Wildlife College. And thank you to The ukuqonda institute for donating the fractions booklets we used at the camp. ...

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